Classics Club Spin #17

Alright, here we go! I decided to participate in The Classics Club Spin #17. I thought I was participating overall, but couldn’t find my list of 50 classic books. I mean, not that it really matters because I probably would still have 50 books on my list.

Anyway, how does the Spin work? It’s as easy as 1-2-3. Really. You choose 20 books from your Classics list that you have yet to read before March 9th, post said 20 books to your blog and wait for the morning of March 9th when a number between 1 & 20 will be posted. Then you read the book with the corresponding number by April 30th. What!? How simple could that be?

The way I selected the books was simple. I’m already participating in the Back to Classics challenge, so half of the books came from there. The remaining are a mix of rereads and books I bought but have yet to read. I also wanted to make sure I had a good representation of POC authors and/or main character representation. For a couple of numbers there are two books listed. The reason is that they’re short and I thought I’d give myself a little more of a challenge.

  1. Turn of the Screw by Henry James
  2. The Tale of Genji by Murasaki Shikibu*
  3. 1984 by George Orwell
  4. I Know Why the Caged Bird by Maya Angelou
  5. One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia-Marquez
  6. Black Boy by Richard Wright
  7. The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins
  8. Beowulf translate by Seamus Heaney
  9. Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison
  10. Candide by Voltaire/The Prince by Machiavelli
  11. The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
  12. Cane by Jean Toomer/Passing by Nella Larsen
  13. Rosanna by Maj Sjowal
  14. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
  15. Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
  16. The Best Short Stories by Black Writers: 1899-1967 edited by James Baldwin, Gwendolyn Brooks & Paul Laurence Dunbar
  17. Almanac of the Dead by Leslie Marmon Silko
  18. Candide by Voltaire/The Prince by Machiavelli
  19. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  20. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

*FYI: I put The Tale of Genji on the list but I can’t find it. If it’s still MIA and its number is selected, I’ll read The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco

Which book would you like to see me read for The Classics Club Spin?

4 thoughts on “Classics Club Spin #17

  1. Oh, 1984 is something else. Too disturbingly realistic these days, sadly. The Angelou is stunning – I just finally read it last year and it blew me away. I’ve seen The Moonstone on a couple of lists, which is exciting because Collins is awesome. I’ve never read Wright or Ellison, aside from some essays, and that’s really bugging me right now. I need to get on that! Huckleberry Finn is an absolute favorite — I think it, more than any other novel, is “American” at its core. And Candide is just hilarious. Such a great list – I think you’ll be “lucky” no matter what happens! 🙂

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  2. Nothing specific, but I think you should not choose a reread. I liked a lot of these books, but some I know are just nerdy me, like Beowulf – I loved it but most hated it. A few, like To Kill a Mockingbird and Huckleberry Finn, if you haven’t read them yet (not from your reread list), you have to read them.

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    • Understood. The re-read I have on the list are from high school and college. Well over 20 years ago. I wanted to see if my opinions of them have changed now that I’m an adult and had some life experiences. I read a prose version of Beowulf in a college British Lit class, which I didn’t care for and someone recommended the Seamus Heaney poetry translation.

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